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Walking accessibility

Pedestrian with a walker

Increasing the walkability and accessibility of Vancouver's streets and sidewalks is a City priority. It is important that all residents are able to participate fully in the community, regardless of ability.

Sidewalk curb ramps

Curb ramps on street corners create access for people using wheelchairs, walkers, and strollers.

Recognizing the importance of sidewalk accessibility early on, the City has been installing over 200 curb ramps per year since the 1960s.

There are curb ramps on more than 95% of sidewalk curbs in the downtown core.

Request a curb ramp

Many existing curb ramps in Vancouver were installed because someone asked for them. If there is a sidewalk you think needs a curb ramp, call 3-1-1 and let the City know.

Our engineers prioritize curb ramp requests to areas with a high level of pedestrian traffic, including:

  • Collector and arterial roads
  • Bus routes
  • Schools
  • Community centres
  • Shopping areas

Get accessible parking information

Accessible parking symbol

Accessible parking

Find accessible parking in Vancouver. Learn about parking exemptions for people with disabilities, and how to get a SPARC parking permit.

Get accessible transit information

Woman in a wheelchair boarding a bus using ramp

Accessible public transit

Find out how the City works with TransLink, the regional transit authority, to plan and develop accessible streets and transportation in Vancouver.

Find accessible recreation programs

Adapted sit skiing is part of the adapted special-needs program opportunities

Adapted and integrated programs

Do you need support to participate in recreational activities? Vancouver offers adapted and integrated programs and services for people with disabilities or special needs.

Groovy edges

Sidewalk curb ramps

The grooves on curb edges allow people using walking sticks and canes to feel when the sidewalk slopes, and where the sidewalk ends.

Accessible crosswalks

Accessible crosswalk audible signal

Audible signals are also used to make crosswalks accessible, by allowing people with vision impairments to hear when to cross the street.